California County COVID-19 Transmission Risk Map

California County Covid-19 Risk Map

Every county in California is assigned to a color-coded tier based on its rate of new cases and positivity. At a minimum, counties must remain in a tier for at least 3 weeks before moving forward. Data is reviewed weekly and tiers are updated on Tuesdays. To move forward, a county must meet the next tier’s criteria for two consecutive weeks. If a county’s metrics worsen for two consecutive weeks, it will be assigned a more restrictive tier. Public health officials are constantly monitoring data and can step in if necessary.

What Are The California County Risk Levels?

This framework lays out the measures that each county must meet, based on indicators that capture disease burden, testing, and health equity. A county may be more restrictive than this framework. This framework also notes signals of concern, including impacted healthcare capacity that may lead to a dimming intervention. This framework replaces the current County Data Monitoring metrics. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to be an evolving situation and new evidence and understanding emerge, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) will continue to reassess metric thresholds. See the chart below for the framework metrics as set according to tiers based on the risk of community disease transmission.


Schools may reopen for in-person instruction based on equivalent criteria to the July 17th School Re-opening Framework previously announced. That framework remains in effect except that Tier 1 is substituted for the previous County Data Monitoring List (which has equivalent criteria to Tier 1). Schools in counties within Tier 1 are not permitted to reopen for in-person instruction, with an exception for waivers granted by local health departments for TK-6 grades. Schools that are not authorized to reopen, including TK-6 schools that have not received a waiver, may provide structured, in-person supervision and services to students under the Guidance for Small Cohorts/Groups of Children and Youth.

 Schools are eligible for reopening fully for in-person instruction following California School Sector Specific Guidelines once the county is off Tier 1 for 14 days, which is similar to being off the County Data Monitoring List for at least 14 days. Potential re-closure should follow the July 17th School Re-opening Framework.

How Much Does Big Pharma Spend on Advertising & PR?

TV Advertising Spending by Network in 2015 (Not accurate but you get the point)

News used to be separate from entertainment programs. Those rules were changed. New Zealand and the US are the only countries that allow pharmaceutical product ads on TV. Our news outlets are now majority funded by pharma. In another record year for pharma TV ads, more than 70% of advertising is spent by big pharma ($5B).


  
See the full list of the top 20 TV ad spenders below, courtesy of iSpot.tv
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1. AbbVie’s Humira: $375 million
2. Pfizer’s Lyrica: $213 million
3. Pfizer’s Xeljanz: $209 million
4. Eli Lilly’s Trulicity: $183 million
5. Bayer and Johnson & Johnson's Xarelto: $143 million
6. Celgene’s Otezla: $139 million
7. Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb's Eliquis: $136 million
8. Merck’s Keytruda: $107 million
9. Pfizer’s Ibrance: $92 million
10. Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly's Jardiance: $86 million
11. Otsuka and Lundbeck's Rexulti: $84 million
12. Eli Lilly’s Taltz: $83 million
13. Eli Lilly’s Verzenio: $80.4 million
14. Pfizer’s Prevnar 13: $79.9 million
15. Pfizer’s Eucrisa: $79.7 million
16. Sunovion’s Latuda: $78 million
17. Novo Nordisk’s Victoza: $78 million
18. AstraZeneca’s Farxiga: $75 million
19. Amgen’s Enbrel: $70 million
20. Novartis’ Cosentyx: $64 million

Here is a list of top 50 companies

If you watch television for any amount of time, you’re probably going to see a drug commercial that tugs on your heart strings, promises to heal your worst medical conditions, and then a voiceover will quickly gloss over the multitude of side effects in a too-quick-to-understand string of monotone words. Prescription medications are are multi-BILLION dollar industry that’s making not only the pharmaceutical companies tons of money, but also the network television stations. How is this influencing public opinion AND health?

Are you annoyed yet how much these ads are on TV?   Equally concerning is that pharmaceutical advertising is banned in just about every country except the United States and New Zealand. And consider this: the average American watches 16 hours of pharmaceutical commercials each year which is more time than they spend with their primary physician. One-third of these people ask their doctors about a drug advertisement and most request a prescription.

Are any these companies responsible for the negative PR campaigns to smear Dr. Judy Mikovitz theory PhD Scientist "A Vaccine Could Be Causing The Covid-19 Pandemic"?  All of these debunking articles are trying to discredit Judy's reputation and none of them really are answering the true questions that she raises.


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Contact Tracing Legitimate or a Scam?


You’ve probably been hearing a lot about contact tracing. It’s the process of identifying people who have come in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, instructing them to quarantine and monitoring their symptoms daily.

If you’re contacted about possible exposure to the coronavirus, make sure it’s legit. Scammers are masquerading as contact tracers, and it’s smart to verify calls or texts before giving out any information.

 A tracer’s job is to help contain the pandemic by reaching out to people who may be spreading the coronavirus. You could be called because your test was positive. Or perhaps someone who tested positive named you as someone they’d been in contact with, and now you need to be tested.

Scammers read the news, too, and are trying to capitalize on tracing campaigns. They’ve even made calls appear to come from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. And yet actual tracers can’t do their work if we won’t pick up the phone.

Contact tracers are usually hired by a state’s department of public health. They work with an infected person to get the names and phone numbers for everyone that infected person came in close contact with while the possibly infectious. Those names and phone numbers are often kept in an online system. People who had contact with someone infected with COVID-19 may first get a text message from the health department, telling them they’ll get a call from a specific number. The tracer who calls will not ask for personal information, like a Social Security number. At the end of the call, some states ask if the contact would like to enroll in a text message program, which sends daily health and safety reminders until the 14-day quarantine ends. But tracers won’t ask you for money or information like your Social Security, bank account, or credit card number. Anyone who does is a scammer.